Employee

Mosaic Web Resources Index

Your knowledge, positive attitude, and actions are key to making your company more diverse and inclusive. Everyone in the company is unique and valuing that unique background helps agencies, clients and media to be more creative and solve marketing challenges better. Select one of the areas below to see how you can become a stronger player in making advertising more inclusive.


Personalizing Inclusion and Diversity: Valuing others requires self-understanding

Mentoring: Learning from each other leads to moving forward together

Career Mapping: Strategic planning yields progress in advertising


Tips for minority professional staff on personalizing inclusion and diversity:

  1. Realize you’re not exempt from the inclusion journey by virtue of being in the minority. Do your part to value cultures other than your own and let go of the assumption that you know all there is to know about the majority. Uniqueness lies within every individual.
  2. Be open to answer questions and engage in conversation about your own culture. Rather than being a spokesperson, qualify your opinion and perspective as your own, and not necessarily that of everyone a particular group.
  3. Accept that no one owes you anything. Drop any feelings of entitlement to special treatment and steer clear of expecting the organization to provide “reparations” for diversity deficiencies.
  4. Manage stereotypical gut reactions to people, perspectives and ideas that are different from your own.

Tips for non-minority professional staff on personalizing inclusion and diversity:

  1. Realize you’re not exempt from the inclusion journey by virtue of being in the majority. Recognize the cultural and diversity dimensions you possess. Do your part to value cultures other than your own. Uniqueness lies within every individual.
  2. Recognize that your being in the majority may communicate stereotypes of power and automatic inclusion into “the club” or “in group” even if such a perception is not accurate. Be open to answer questions and engage in conversation about your own culture.
  3. Be careful not to expect minority colleagues to represent all minorities’ thoughts, attitudes or behaviors. They are no more race or ethnic representatives than you are. Recognize what they say is their experience and not necessarily representative of all others; just as you are unique and not representative of your whole race or ethnicity.
  4. Manage stereotypical gut reactions to people, perspectives and ideas that are different from your own.


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